Sunday, March 30, 2014

An Incident on March 7, 1903

This article is from the New York Tribune, March 8, 1903. I think it's interesting on its own, but the thing I find especially fascinating is that the performance and incident took place March 7, 1903, the day my father—Harry Luckstone's first child—was born. I hope he made it home for the birth.

STAGE DAGGER WOUNDS.

Flies from Sheath and Hits Musician and Actress.

At the matinee performance of “Nancy Brown,” at the Bijou Theatre, yesterday, John C. Reitzel, one of the musicians in the orchestra, and Miss Anna Buckley, an actress, who was sitting in the front row, were injured by the fall of a heavy dagger from the stage. Reitzel was seriously hurt, but the woman escaped with a scratch or two and a nervous shock.

At the end of the first act Harry Luckstone, who plays the part of the Prince, is called on to engage in an encounter with two others in the cast, one of them being thrown to the stage. Luckstone wears a heavy Oriental dagger in his belt, and in the scuffle yesterday the handle of this weapon caught in the lace of the sleeve. The weapon was pulled violently out of its sheath.

It flew into the orchestra, striking Reitzel heavily between the eyes and then bounded off and struck Miss Buckley in the breast, falling to the floor across her wrist. The bridge of the musician’s nose was crushed in so that he will be disfigured for life, and it was feared last night that his brain might be injured.

The sight of the blood from his wound caused a stir in the audience. Miss Buckley and two or three women who had not been hurt at all fainted. The performance went on, however, which restored the audience to quietness. Reitzel was carried home.


8 comments:

mm said...

And the women all fainted...

Susan said...

What else could they do? Deal with it? Help out? ;-)

Country Reflections said...

Wow, that is so interesting, although tragic!

Julia said...

A good thing it didn't happened in today world. The company sure would have been sued for negligence.

What a tragic thing to happen on stage.
Thanks for sharing this interesting bit of nostalgia.
Hugs,
JB

Indigo Bunting said...

This is fascinating. And on such a day!

Susan said...

I found the article on this website of newspapers from 1836 to 1922. All sorts of fascinating stuff....

Chronicling America

Eulalia Benejam Cobb said...

Hmmm...I wonder if worry about the incident precipitated your grandmother's labor?

Susan said...

I never thought of that. As far as I know, my dad wasn't premature. He was their first, if that makes a difference.